Sight & Sound articles

From our archives

1 - 10 of 13

Pages

  • The tragic mountain: the making of The Epic of Everest

    Filmed on the 1924 climbing expedition that cost George Mallory and Sandy Irvine their lives, The Epic of Everest was more than a record of a heroic failure: it set new standards for documentary making – and had political effects that are still being felt, writes Wade Davis.

    Wade Davis
    Friday 29 May 2020

    From our archives

  • Cagney and the Mob: Kenneth Tynan on Hollywood’s original gangster

    In this profile from our May 1951 issue, the legendary critic Kenneth Tynan reflects on the extraordinary career and influence of James Cagney, Hollywood’s original gangster, who blurred the line between hero and villain.

    Kenneth Tynan
    Tuesday 5 May 2020

    From our archives

  • Scissors make films: Lotte Reiniger on creating her magical animations

    In this piece from our Spring 1936 issue, Lotte Reiniger, the great German pioneer of silhouette animation, explains how she makes her magical films from paper and card.

    Lotte Reiniger
    Friday 1 May 2020

    From our archives

  • From the Magazine

    The pattern under the plough: the ‘old, weird Britain’ on film

    The rhythms and rituals of rural life have seldom been conspicuous in British cinema. But in this feature from our August 2010 issue, Rob Young looks back to feature films of the 1960s and 70s, and to documentaries across the decades, and finds that traces of the ‘old, weird Britain’ can still be unearthed.

     

    Rob Young
    Sunday 26 April 2020

    From our archives

  • From the Magazine

    Humphrey and Bogey: Bogart by Louise Brooks

    In this piece from our Winter 1966 issue, Lulu herself, Louise Brooks, one of the great stars of silent cinema, writes about the Humphrey Bogart she knew from her years in Hollywood – the man before the myth.

    Louise Brooks
    Wednesday 22 April 2020

    From our archives

  • Some notes about the art of falling: Charlie Chaplin by John Berger

    In this piece from our January 2015 issue, John Berger considers Chaplin a century after The Tramp first strolled on to cinema screens, and finds that his early films have lost none of their surprise or humour or bite or illumination. 

    John Berger
    Thursday 16 April 2020

    From our archives

  • From the Magazine

    Poet of time: Wong Kar-Wai on Chungking Express

    In this interview from our September 1995 issue, Tony Rayns catches up with Wong Kar Wai on the set of Fallen Angels to talk about the Hong Kong director’s achingly cool romance Chungking Express, one of the defining works of 90s arthouse cinema.

    Tony Rayns
    Wednesday 15 April 2020

    From our archives

  • Julie Christie, the honey-glow girl

    Julie Christie has survived being the representative of a new generation into political activism and grande dame-hood. As she turns 80, we revisit the great, underrated actor behind the beauty in this profile from our December 2005 issue.

    Melanie Williams
    Tuesday 14 April 2020

    From our archives

  • From the Magazine

    The first kiss takes so long: Richard Linklater on Before Sunrise

    Richard Linklater’s Before Sunrise was released in UK cinemas 25 years ago this week. In this interview from our May 1995 issue, the director talks to Ben Thompson about the then new film, about becoming a filmmaker, and about his favourite high school movies.

    Ben Thompson
    Wednesday 8 April 2020

    From our archives

  • From the Magazine

    Jean-Pierre Melville: a samurai in Paris

    In this interview from our Summer 1968 issue, Rui Noguiera and Francois Truchaud spoke to the French director Jean-Pierre Melville shortly after the release of his classic neo-noir film Le Samourai, starring Alain Delon in one of his defining roles.

    Rui Noguiera, François Truchaud
    Monday 6 April 2020

    From our archives

1 - 10 of 13

Pages

Back to the top

See something different

Subscribe now for exclusive offers and the best of cinema.
Hand-picked.