Andriy Khalpakhchi

General director, Molodist Kyiv International Film Festival since 1990; director, Ukrainian Cinema Foundation since 2005; film critic; member of FIAPF commission for film festivals; member of the Ukrainian State Film Agency

Ukraine

Voted in the critics’ poll

Voted for

Ashes and Diamonds

1958

Andrzej Wajda

Battleship Potemkin

1925

Sergei M Eisenstein

Citizen Kane

1941

Orson Welles

City Lights

1931

Charles Chaplin

Damned, The

1969

Luchino Visconti

Earth

1930

Aleksandr Dovzhenko

Rashomon

1950

Akira Kurosawa

Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors

1964

Sergei Parajanov

strada, La

1954

Federico Fellini

Wild Strawberries

1957

Ingmar Bergman

Comments

It’s always very difficult to make this choice because there are more than ten films that are really great. But, anyway, for me there are two ways of choosing: first, by the head – to count the movies that have a place in the history of world cinema or that led a new wave revolution; second, by the heart – movies that impressed me emotionally or were revolutionary to my consciousness. This list includes more films that I saw for first time when I was young, at a time when I didn’t recognise cinema as an art. This includes films such as Atalanta by Griffith, which I am sure must be included in a top ten of world cinema. For me, it holds a historical place in the world cinema, as with the films of Jean Vigo or Abel Gans. This is how I explain the fact that I did not include the films from this early epoch, except for Sergey Eisenstein’s Battleship Potyomkin, from 1925. On the other hand, the latest year I have included is 1969, when Visconti made his Gotterdammerung. There is no movie from the last 43 years! Perhaps more recent films could be considered rather for a top 100 than for the top ten.

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